A BIT CLOSER TO THE OCEANS

No need to glue your nose to the glass of the aquarium, it’s seated on the tiered seats that you’ll be able to make the most of the “great ocean show” A 100 sq.m bay window offers an unusual panorama, an incredible view of the seascape of the high seas.
Inspired by Malpelo Island which is off the coast of Colombia, the great high-seas tank highlights the fauna out in the depths of the Pacific.
You can make out the manta ray in the distance, advancing as if it was floating in front of you. It swims in the middle of the schools of fish, and suddenly loops the loop several times before heading off back to the bottom of the tank.
More than 40 species of fish, sharks and rays share the great tank. With its 10,000 cu.m and its exceptional dimensions (the tank measures 60 m long by 35 m wide), the high-seas tank and the great bay are the exhibition’s key attractions Journey on the high seas.
To learn more about the great high-seas tank, you can always take a visit behind the scenes.

THE ANIMALS IN THE GREAT HIGH-SEAS TANK

The great manta ray can measure up to 8 metres long and weigh as much as 1.8 tonnes, which makes it the biggest ray in the world. They feed on plankton.
 Find out more about the manta ray
The other species of ray at Nausicaá

Sandbar shark

The great tank’s sandbar sharks are easy to spot: they’re always on the move. Usually swimming close to the bottom, they particularly like sandy areas.

Find out more about the sandbar shark
Discover other sharks at Nausicaá

NAUSICAÁ SUPPORTS THE MALPELO FOUNDATION

Through the tenacity of Sandra Bessudo, Malpelo island, which inspired the Journey on the High Seas exhibition, has become a vast marine sanctuary. She created the Malpelo Foundation  in 1999 to protect the island.
Nausicaá supports the foundation’s initiatives and in particular, a research project focused on preserving hammerhead sharks.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • The great manta ray can be recognised by the cephalic growths it has on each side of its wide mouth.
  • The great high-seas tank is also home to some eagle rays,  devil rays and blackchin guitarfish.
  • The eagle rays rummage through the tank’s sand to find the shellfish that the keepers hide there.
  • The  10,000 cu.m of water exerts a pressure of 500 tonnes on the bay window!