DIVE INTO A WORLD OF COLOUR IN THE TROPICAL LAGOON

Take the time to discover Nausicaá’s tropical lagoon in the Mankind and Shores exhibition. More than 3,000 animals from 130 different species swim before your eyes in a 300 cu.m aquarium.
The surgeonfish, triggerfish, wrasse, angelfish and butterflyfish, Orbicular batfish not to mention the  banggai cardinalfishes all vie to outdo each other with their wealth of colours and different shapes to offer you an impression of life and abundance. The fish swim amongst the corals that were raised in  Nausicaá’s nurseries.
As you continue your tour you‘ll discover the aquariums nestling in the Coral Jungle space where the clownfish swim side by side with the mandarinfish and  boxfish.

THE ANIMALS IN THE TROPICAL LAGOON

What a challenge it would be to try to count the number of fish in Nausicaá’s tropical lagoon! Here are some of the species present in the lagoon that you’ll now be able to identify: not just fish, but corals too.

Zebra shark

Easily identifiable in the lagoon, the distinctive feature of the zebra sharks is that they are fed individually by the keepers close to the lagoon’s beach.

 

Tropical reef fish

Surgeonfish, wrasse, butterflyfish and angelfish, the different species mingle and form a fascinating ballet of shapes and colours.

 

Discover the tropical reef fishes’ data sheets

WITH THE REEFSCAPERS ASSOCIATION, NAUSICAÁ SUPPORTS THE RESTORATION OF THE CORAL REEFS

For more than 10 years, Nausicaá supports the Reefscapers association  whose number-one goal is to restore the coral reefs of the Maldives.
In 2019, thanks to the sponsorship of Nausicaá 10 coral structures were installed at Landaa Giraavaru in the Maldives, representing 700 reconstituted coral colonies. These new colonies are monitored regularly by the biologists on the spot to check they are developing properly.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Corals are animals that form their skeleton using the minerals present in the sea. They live in symbiosis with a seaweed called zooxanthellea Corals live in colonies of individuals called polyps.
  • Coral reefs make up only 0.2% of the oceans, but they form 30% of global marine biodiversity.
  • The services provided by coral ecosystems represent €1.3 billion per year.

The species that live in coral reefs could be at the origin of new molecules, substances and genes that have applications in a large number of areas such as the fight against cancer.