THE SEA IS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS IN THE TOUCH TANK

Le bassin tactile de Nausicaá, raie bouclée et public

 

Stroking a fish, would you ever have thought of doing that? Around Nausicaá’s touch tank, in the “Mankind and Shores” exhibition, you’ll be able to get as close as possible to the fish, they’re within your reach.
Once you’ve got over the first impression of coldness – the fish in the touch tank are cold-water fish – you’ll be amazed by the softness of the ray’s stomach, by the roughness of the catshark’s body.
The fish gladly come towards the visitors, and move away as the fancy takes them.
So, ready to put your hand in?

THE FISH IN THE TOUCH TANK

Living in cold waters, the fish in the touch tank represent common species that can be found in the North Sea and in the Atlantic, in particular.

Thornback ray

The touch tank’s star attraction! The thornback ray loves to get close to the visitors, waiting to be stroked, and then swims off to settle on the bottom of the tank.

Small-spotted catshark

And what if you touched a shark? Well yes, as its name suggests the small-spotted catshark is a member of the shark family! Often settled at the bottom of the touch tank, the small-spotted catshark feeds on molluscs and small fish.

Find out more about the small-spotted catshark

WITH THE SUMARIS PROJECT, NAUSICAÁ TAKES AN INTEREST IN THE RAYS ALONG OUR COASTS

Sumaris (logos du projet) et Interreg des deux mers. Photo d'une raie.Nausicaá is taking part in the European SUMARIS project which brings together Dutch, Belgian, English and French partners. The purpose of this project is to put a more sustainable system in place for managing the ray species found in the Channel and the North Sea by developing our scientific knowledge of the status of the stocks of each species, their reproduction cycles and survival rates.

 

 

 

Playfully learn more about rays by making your origami fish.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Juvenile pollack can make little grunting noises when they are hunting.
  • Turbot are a sinistral species, which means they have both of their eyes on their left side.
  • The eggs laid by rays are called ”egg cases”.
  • There are six species of rays at Nausicaá spread around the different exhibition areas.

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